Monthly Archives: August 2010

Birmingham Repertory Theatre - Latest Posts for News: Revolution

This predicament for the vast majority of the population (who by now lived in poverty and with very little real freedom) eventually led to the revolution of 1905. Alexander II was assassinated in 1881 by a revolutionary group, and his successor Alexander III reacted by placing restrictions on local government and increasing the power and reach of the Russian secret police to supress revolutionary groups. Some members of revolutionary groups emigrated throughout Europe in order to avoid prose...

Birmingham Repertory Theatre - Latest Posts for News: The October Manifesto

The events of ‘Bloody Sunday’ led many ordinary Russians into becoming active revolutionaries, but there were still many different groups, all with their own agendas and ideas for reform (one group, the Bolsheviks, was led by Lenin, later to head the Soviet regime following the revolution of 1917 which ended Tsarist rule). In August 1905 Nicholas II agreed to the formation of a ‘Duma’ (parliament), but it soon became clear that this did not allow as much power to the ...

Birmingham Repertory Theatre - Latest Posts for News: The Emancipation Of The Serfs

The formal emancipation of the serfs began shortly after Alexander II became Tsar. He set up a reform commission to examine the problem, which quite predictably met with considerable opposition from landowners. As a compromise Alexander allowed the serfs their freedom, but did not allow them to take land from those who had been their ‘masters.’ In fact, former serfs had to pay their former masters over a number of years for any land that they claimed. Many fell behind with their ...

Birmingham Repertory Theatre - Latest Posts for News: Chekhov’s Characters

Many of Chekhov’s plays and stories (including The Cherry Orchard) deal with characters who have become disillusioned with their middle class lives. Once great estates have crumbled they are often forced to sell off large amounts of land. Chekhov’s characters also often display a characteristic often said to be peculiar to Russians known as ‘Oblomovism,’ named after a character of incredible lethargy in Goncharov’s novel Oblomov. A general state of disinterested...

Birmingham Repertory Theatre - Latest Posts for News: Revolution

This predicament for the vast majority of the population (who by now lived in poverty and with very little real freedom) eventually led to the revolution of 1905. Alexander II was assassinated in 1881 by a revolutionary group, and his successor Alexander III reacted by placing restrictions on local government and increasing the power and reach of the Russian secret police to supress revolutionary groups. Some members of revolutionary groups emigrated throughout Europe in order to avoid prose...

Birmingham Repertory Theatre - Latest Posts for News: The October Manifesto

The events of ‘Bloody Sunday’ led many ordinary Russians into becoming active revolutionaries, but there were still many different groups, all with their own agendas and ideas for reform (one group, the Bolsheviks, was led by Lenin, later to head the Soviet regime following the revolution of 1917 which ended Tsarist rule). In August 1905 Nicholas II agreed to the formation of a ‘Duma’ (parliament), but it soon became clear that this did not allow as much power to the ...

Birmingham Repertory Theatre - Latest Posts for News: The Emancipation Of The Serfs

The formal emancipation of the serfs began shortly after Alexander II became Tsar. He set up a reform commission to examine the problem, which quite predictably met with considerable opposition from landowners. As a compromise Alexander allowed the serfs their freedom, but did not allow them to take land from those who had been their ‘masters.’ In fact, former serfs had to pay their former masters over a number of years for any land that they claimed. Many fell behind with their ...

Birmingham Repertory Theatre - Latest Posts for News: Chekhov’s Characters

Many of Chekhov’s plays and stories (including The Cherry Orchard) deal with characters who have become disillusioned with their middle class lives. Once great estates have crumbled they are often forced to sell off large amounts of land. Chekhov’s characters also often display a characteristic often said to be peculiar to Russians known as ‘Oblomovism,’ named after a character of incredible lethargy in Goncharov’s novel Oblomov. A general state of disinterested...